Duke Nonprofit Management Courses

The Cameron Foundation is working in partnership with Duke University to provide nonprofit management classes for organizations serving the Tri-Cities area. The partnership between The Cameron Foundation and the university has been developed as part of a combination of resources that are aimed toward nonprofit excellence in the region. The Duke classes, which are customized through Duke University’s Office of Continuing Education, represent a cornerstone of the Foundation’s capacity building program.

The board and staff of The Cameron Foundation have identified several goals to be accomplished in its approach to capacity building in 2020, including the following:

  • To provide the appropriate level and intensity of resources to meet each nonprofit organization’s need and current capacity.
  • To achieve measurable improvement in leadership, management, governance, sustainability, and overall ability to deliver impactful services.
  • To strengthen the sector systemically by creating stronger networks of service providers, within and across categories of service delivery.

Note: These offerings are now provided as webinars. Click here to learn more about the webinar requirements.

For the remainder of 2020, the Foundation will offer the following classes. All classes will run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Registration is now open for:

Community Engagement & Collaboration
July 16, 2020
Kelly Joyner Lee

Understand collaboration and how it works. This high impact course will help you focus on expanding your nonprofit network. Find out the connection between engagement and collaboration through a series of exercises designed to help you identify your organization’s assets and needs. Where are you now and where do you want to go?

Marketing is important for nonprofit organizations. Find out how nonprofits use different marketing tactics to promote their message and their organization. Also, why it is good for nonprofits to channel their energy into the best ways for them to be heard.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn how to expand your nonprofit’s circle of collaboration
  • Know the incentives/benefits/advantages of community engagement and collaboration
  • Marketing is important for nonprofit organizations. Find out how nonprofits use different marketing tactics to promote their message and their organization. Also, why it is good for nonprofits to channel their energy into the best ways for them to be heard.
  • Discuss participants’ strategies for effective marketing
  • Know who you are marketing to

Bio: Kelly Joyner Lee works as a regional director for the North Carolina Community Foundation, serving seven counties in Eastern North Carolina. She has extensive experience in board and fund development, grant writing, small group facilitation, marketing and nonprofit engagement in communities. Ms. Lee is the co-creator of the “Leading for Tomorrow Nonprofit Capacity Building Summit” and is a founding member of the Women Givers of Nash-Rocky Mount.

The deadline to register for this class is Friday, July 10. Class size is limited to 25 participants, and participation is on a first-come, first-served basis. Participation is limited to not more than three members per organization to allow multiple organizations to benefit. The fee is a nominal $35, which includes all the needed materials so that participants will not need to purchase additional books or other items.

All payments are processed via PayPal, and payment is due at the time of registration. Please note that the registration fee is nonrefundable.

You may complete your registration and payment using the form below:

Name: (required)

Title: (required)

Organization name: (required)

Organization address: (required)

Is your organization a 501(c)(3) nonprofit (yes/no)? If not, please explain. (required)

Year your organization was established: (required)

Number of staff: (required)

Size ($) of annual operating budget: (required)

Email: (required)

Phone number: (required)

Succession Planning: Preparing for Executive Transition
August 27, 2020
Jeanne Allen, EdS

Being able to replace employees in leadership positions is the focus of succession planning in nonprofits. Succession planning is a strategic approach to ensure that necessary talent and skills are available when needed – and that essential knowledge and abilities are maintained when key employees leave. Nonprofits have an increased sense of urgency about succession planning retirements and other demographic and labor market trends. Nonprofits will be better positioned to compete successfully by implementing a succession plan to close the gaps. Participants will review a succession readiness checklist to determine the proper steps for developing a plan for their organizations.

Learning objectives:

  • Discuss the scope and definition of succession planning
  • Explore assessing organizational readiness
  • Identify essential elements of a nonprofit succession plan

Bio: Jeanne Allen, EdS, has 30+ years of nonprofit sector experience. This includes her current business, Jeanne Allen Consulting; providing training and facilitation to nonprofits on board development and strategic planning; as well as designing and facilitating board and staff retreats. Prior to her role as instructor in the Duke University Nonprofit Management Program, she worked in New York as a management consultant at Girl Scouts USA national headquarters in New York City; and assistant dean, Multicultural Programs, Westchester Community College (NY). Ms. Allen earned an EdS in instructional systems technology and an MS in adult education from Indiana University as well as a BA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additionally, she holds the highly regarded Certified Governance Trainer from Board Source.

Previously this year, the Foundation offered:

Creating High Performance Teams
February 20, 2020
Robert Kenney, PhD

As nonprofits work with multiple cultures within the U.S. and throughout the world, understanding how to foster optimal interaction among staff and boards is critical to developing high-performing and high-functioning teams. In this class, you will explore why these concepts are important for nonprofit organizations, their teams, their boards and themselves. We’ll explore the different ways in which Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Millennials communicate. And we’ll begin developing action plans for use within your organizations to create high performing teams in a multi-cultural and multi-generational workplace.

Learning objectives — after this class, participants will be able to:

  • Apply strategies for working successfully within diverse teams
  • Develop deeper insight into different working styles
  • Demonstrate their drive or motivation to learn about different cultures
  • Increase their knowledge about how culture in general shapes someone’s behaviors, values and beliefs
  • Take what they have learned from being aware of cultural differences and make robust, culturally sensitive plans as a result
  • Interact with others in a culturally sensitive, respectful way, including being able to think on their feet in difficult situations

Bio: Robert Kenney, PhD, has taught in Duke’s Certificate Program in Nonprofit Management since 1995. Dr. Kenney has a doctorate in organizational psychology and has designed and delivered management, leadership and team development workshops for over 25 years. He works with nonprofit organizations, hospitals and pharmaceutical companies, manufacturing and biotechnology businesses, service-based organizations, colleges and universities, local and state governments, as well as federal government agencies. He works with clients from across the United States and internationally.

Performance Measurement for Nonprofit Organizations
April 16, 2020
Matt Nash, MBA

This course is designed to help nonprofit professionals understand the process of measuring program success relative to the stated mission and vision, and how to define metrics respective to their organizations. Participants will gain an idea of the metrics they can measure as a determinant of organizational success – and have a clear understanding of metric development and measurement.

As federal, state and local dollars become more competitive, telling your board, staff and funders about your good work takes more than story telling. While the concept of measuring performance is not new, the development of practical ways to implement actual measure is. This session provides a conceptual framework of performance measurement.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the importance of performance measurement
  • Learn how to design performance measures through data collection and analysis
  • Discuss the theory of change for designing and measuring program performance
  • Discuss a framework on cost effective performance analysis

Bio: Matthew T.A. Nash, MBA, is the managing director for social entrepreneurship for the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. He also is an adjunct professor of the practice at Duke’s Sanford School of Public Policy, where he teaches undergraduate courses on social innovation and human-centered design. He is a senior fellow with the Duke Center for International Development and is past executive director of the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship, where he co-founded the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke. Matt has extensive domestic and international social and public sector experience in social innovation, social enterprise, strategic planning, organization development, performance measurement, board development and governance, business process transformation and leadership development.

Managing Multiple Priorities and Your Time
May 21, 2020
Robert Kenney, PhD

Confusion over priorities becomes a problem for people in nonprofits, where individuals often wear many hats and their time is stretched thin. Participation in this class will allow you to assess how you currently spend your time; use your priorities as a filtering system to create meaningful accomplishments; as well as eliminate or reduce your biggest time wasters, such as the telephone, drop-in visitors, procrastination, the inability to say “no,” personal disorganization, and perfectionism. While it is not mandatory, you can complete a time audit before coming to class.

Learning objectives — after this class, participants will be able to:

  • Identify how they currently spend their time
  • Identify and focus their energy on high-priority tasks and responsibilities
  • Develop an ongoing check of their activities relative to their priorities
  • Eliminate or better manage their biggest time wasters
  • Use their learnings to help others better manage their time and focus on priorities

Bio: Robert Kenney, PhD, has taught in Duke’s Certificate Program in Nonprofit Management since 1995. Dr. Kenney has a doctorate in organizational psychology and has designed and delivered management, leadership and team development workshops for over 25 years. He works with nonprofit organizations, hospitals and pharmaceutical companies, manufacturing and biotechnology businesses, service-based organizations, colleges and universities, local and state governments, as well as federal government agencies. He works with clients from across the United States and internationally.

Maximizing Individual Donors (Developing a Strategic Individual Donor Plan)
June 25, 2020
Ruth Peebles, MPA

Understanding how to raise money from individual donors is paramount to nonprofit organizations. Finding and cultivating individual donors is a work-intensive, long-term investment for any nonprofit. Learn how to master effective techniques for successful individual giving efforts related to prospect research, cultivating individual support, making “the ask” and stewardship. Also, where to start your prospect research, tips on best research sites and how to utilize the information found to cultivate and solicit potential donors.

Learning objectives:

  • Locate specific sources for potential individual donors
  • Identify the most-effective “best practices” related to building relationships with individual donors
  • Understand the critical steps in making “an ask”
  • Create an action plan to increase board engagement in individual donor development

Bio: Ruth Peebles, MPA, offers over 30 years of hands‐on experience in nonprofit management, project management, fundraising and organizational development. Her consulting firm, The INS Group, was founded in 1999 with the mission of helping federal, state and local government agencies, nonprofits and faith-based institutions use innovative solutions to build their capacity and sustain their programs and services. Ms. Peebles is an instructor for the Duke University Certificate Program in Nonprofit Management and has served as an adjunct instructor for the School of Public and International Affairs Master of Public Administration Program at North Carolina State University. Ms. Peebles currently serves on Wake County Affiliate Board of the North Carolina Community Foundation and Student U Board of Directors. She is a founding member of the Next Generation of African American Philanthropists giving circle.